AHRC Cultural Spaces of Climate Network

AHRC Cultural Spaces of Climate Network

A limited number of places are available to attend a series of workshops being organised as part of an AHRC Landscape and Environment (Researching Environmental Change) network.  The purpose of the proposed network which is being run in partnership between the University of Nottingham, the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers and the Royal Meteorological Society, is to draw together representatives from the arts and humanities, the broader research community, learned and professional societies, including the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers and the Royal Meteorological Society and amateur  groups, to identify ways to redress the global and scientific bias in climate discourses, to explore the meaning of climate for different groups of people in different spatial and temporal contexts and to interrogate climate’s ontological status. This will be achieved through interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral workshops with the following objectives:

1.)    To question the bias toward climate change, and global as the preferred scale, in contemporary climate research

2.)    To refocus attention on public understanding of climate, and weather, at the local, sensory level

3.)    To consider the changing cultural spaces of climate knowledge production, past and present

4.)    To explore the actual and potential role of interest groups, including enthusiast/amateur, professional and learned societies in the collection, production and circulation of climate knowledge past and present.

There will be three themed workshops.

1.) “Re-culturing Climate” University of Nottingham (December 3rd 2010) . This workshop which will involve presentations and discussions by network members, will focus on ways to incorporate arts and humanities perspectives into contemporary climate research, media representation of climate change issues and climate discourses. Keynote speaker: James Roger Fleming

2.) “Historicising Climate” Royal Geographical Society-with the Institute of British Geographers, Kensington Gore (March 16th 2011). This workshop will focus on how historical perspectives can offer insight into the changing nature of the relationship between climate and people and different cultural attitudes to climate over time. The purpose is also to bring historical materials into wider public and professional circulation and illustrate their use in developing narratives of climates past and present. Again, network members will deliver presentations and the keynote speaker will be Jan Golinski.

3.)    “Popularising Climate” The Royal Meteorological Society, Reading (June 25th 2011). This workshop will focus on the involvement of popular /amateur/ enthusiast meteorological communities to establish how they might become more involved as intermediaries between the public, academic and professional domains. This will dovetail with LWEC objectives aimed at improving the way in which communities in the UK with different cultural backgrounds and belief systems understand – and can live- with climate change.

Expressions of interest in attending the workshops should be sent to Georgina Endfield , School of Geography, University of Nottingham (georgina.endfield@nottingham.ac.uk.

AHRC Cultural Spaces of Climate Network

A limited number of places are available to attend a series of workshops being organised as part of an AHRC Landscape and Environment (Researching Environmental Change) network. The purpose of the proposed network which is being run in partnership between the University of Nottingham, the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers and the Royal Meteorological Society, is to draw together representatives from the arts and humanities, the broader research community, learned and professional societies, including the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers and the Royal Meteorological Society and amateur  groups, to identify ways to redress the global and scientific bias in climate discourses, to explore the meaning of climate for different groups of people in different spatial and temporal contexts and to interrogate climate’s ontological status. This will be achieved through interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral workshops with the following objectives:

1.) To question the bias toward climate change, and global as the preferred scale, in contemporary climate research

2.) To refocus attention on public understanding of climate, and weather, at the local, sensory level

3.) To consider the changing cultural spaces of climate knowledge production, past and present

4.) To explore the actual and potential role of interest groups, including enthusiast/amateur, professional and learned societies in the collection, production and circulation of climate knowledge past and present.

There will be three themed workshops.

1.) “Re-culturing Climate” University of Nottingham (December 3rd 2010) . This workshop which will involve presentations and discussions by network members, will focus on ways to incorporate arts and humanities perspectives into contemporary climate research, media representation of climate change issues and climate discourses. Keynote speaker: James Roger Fleming

2.) “Historicising Climate” Royal Geographical Society-with the Institute of British Geographers, Kensington Gore (March 16th 2011). This workshop will focus on how historical perspectives can offer insight into the changing nature of the relationship between climate and people and different cultural attitudes to climate over time. The purpose is also to bring historical materials into wider public and professional circulation and illustrate their use in developing narratives of climates past and present. Again, network members will deliver presentations and the keynote speaker will be Jan Golinski.

3.) “Popularising Climate” The Royal Meteorological Society, Reading (June 25th 2011). This workshop will focus on the involvement of popular /amateur/ enthusiast meteorological communities to establish how they might become more involved as intermediaries between the public, academic and professional domains. This will dovetail with LWEC objectives aimed at improving the way in which communities in the UK with different cultural backgrounds and belief systems understand – and can live- with climate change.

Expressions of interest in attending the workshops should be sent to Georgina Endfield , School of Geography, University of Nottingham (georgina.endfield@nottingham.ac.uk.

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